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Service Oriented Architecture, A Dead Simple Explanation

Service Oriented Architecture: A Dead Simple Explanation

Service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been with us for a long time. The term first appeared in 1998, and since then it’s grown in popularity. It’s also branched into several variants, including microservice architecture. While microservices dominate the landscape, reports of SOA’s death have been greatly exaggerated. So, let’s go over what SOA is. We’ll cover why it’s an architectural pattern that isn’t going anywhere. Then we’ll see how you can apply its design concepts to your work. Continue reading Service Oriented Architecture: A Dead Simple Explanation

C#_Features_A_List_of_the_Best_Ones

C# Features: An Exhaustive List of the Best Ones

The first post I wrote for the NDepend blog was about C# 8.0 features. That post inspired a sequel, followed by the series’ final chapter. Those posts dealt with the future. Today’s post, on the other hand, is all about what’s already here. I’ll make a list of the C# features I consider to be some of the best ones. For brevity’s sake, I’ll do the briefest overview of each feature, though.
Also, be warned: I’m going to use “C# feature” loosely throughout this post. So you’ll see some items that are, technically, .NET frameworks features. The reason for this choice is that, for many developers, C# and .NET are interchangeable. That’s the way they think, talk, and google about this topic.
Without further ado, let’s dive into it.

Continue reading C# Features: An Exhaustive List of the Best Ones

REST_vs_RESTful_The_Different_and_Why_the_Difference_Doesn_t_Matter

REST vs. RESTful: The Difference and Why the Difference Doesn’t Matter

What’s the difference between a REST API and a RESTful one? Is there a difference? This sounds like the kind of academic question that belongs on Reddit. But then you find yourself in a design session, and the person across the table is raising their voice.

The short answer is that REST stands for Representational State Transfer. It’s an architectural pattern for creating web services. A RESTful service is one that implements that pattern.

The long answer starts with “sort of” and “it depends” and continues with more complete definitions.

Continue reading REST vs. RESTful: The Difference and Why the Difference Doesn’t Matter

Self_Documenting_Code_vs._Comments_Turns_Out_It_s_Both_or_Neither

Self Documenting Code vs. Comments? Turns Out It’s Both or Neither

It’s been about a month since my last research post, and I’ve been musing about the next topic.  What should it be?  Well, I’ve decided.  Since I love nothing more than throwing the gates wide for everyone’s internet anger, I thought I’d weigh in on the subject of self documenting code vs comments.

I’ll be awaiting your rage below, in the comments.

Continue reading Self Documenting Code vs. Comments? Turns Out It’s Both or Neither

Visual_Studio_Enterprise_vs._Professional_Essential_Differences

Visual Studio Enterprise vs. Professional: Essential Differences

If you’re a .NET developer, then it’s overwhelmingly likely that you’re a Visual Studio user. There are alternatives to it, sure. But the product from the Redmond giant is the go-to when it comes to developing for the .NET framework.

For a newcomer, though, things can get confusing since Visual Studio isn’t a single thing.

Instead, it comes in several shapes and sizes.

Which one should you pick? What are the features that matter for your use case?

Since Visual Studio isn’t free—most editions aren’t, at least—you want to get the best bang for your buck.

That’s what this post is going to cover. As its title suggests, we’ll focus on the differences between the enterprise and professional editions of the integrated development environment (IDE).

By the end of the post, you’ll have learned enough to make an informed decision on which version of the IDE better suits your needs.

Wishing your edition of Visual Studio had full architecture tooling support?

Download a free trial of NDepend  and check out all of the architecture visualization you can get without needing to upgrade your VS edition.

Let’s get started.

Continue reading Visual Studio Enterprise vs. Professional: Essential Differences

Should Architects Write Code

Should Architects Write Code? You Bet They Should!

There’s a common misconception that’s permeated our profession: Architects don’t need to write code to do their jobs.

Now, this may seem like a harmless approach. After all, writing code is what developers do. And architects should be busy with more important tasks.

However, keeping architects from writing code can limit the potential of your development teams. It can also result in an architectural mess when requirements and business needs change.

So today let’s look at why giving your software architect time to write code is a good thing. But first, we’ll start off by looking at what life is like as an architect.

Continue reading Should Architects Write Code? You Bet They Should!

When_Is_It_Okay_to_Use_a_C#_Partial_Class

When Is It Okay to Use a C# Partial Class?

Today’s post attempts to answer a very simple and straightforward question: “When is it OK to use a C# partial class?” And the answer as straightforward as this: “When you need to allow the user to edit code that was automatically generated.”

Whoa, that was hands down the easiest post I’ve ever written. So, that’s it for today, folks. Thanks for reading and see you next time!

OK, I’m just kidding, of course. If you’ve found this page by googling around on “C# partial class,” chances are you have a number of questions regarding this topic. For starters, what is a partial class? How do you actually use it? Are there any restrictions regarding its use? And the list could go on.

That’s what today’s post is all about. We’ll start out by explaining what a partial class is and providing some examples. Then, we’ll go a little bit deeper, giving a more detailed view of the partial class, its inner workings, and the rules that must be followed when using it.

Finally, we’ll explain the main use case for the C# partial class, nicely tying the end of the post to its beginning.

Continue reading When Is It Okay to Use a C# Partial Class?

extension_methods_decline_of_traditional_oop

Extension Methods and the Decline of Traditional OOP

A bunch of years ago, I wrote a post on my own personal blog titled, “Why I Don’t Like C# Extension Methods.”  Over the years, I’ve updated that post a bit, but mostly left it intact for posterity I guess.  But if you ask me how that post has aged, I’d respond with “it’s complicated.”

I didn’t like extension methods back then.  I do like them now, provided they aren’t abused.

So, what gives?  Am I just a hypocrite?  Or is it a matter of growth?

Well, none of the above, I’d argue.  Instead, the programming landscape has changed and evolved.  And I’d submit that extension methods were actually ahead of their time when the language authors came up with the concept.  But now they’re hitting their stride.

Don’t take my word for it, though.  This is another one of my research posts, whose previous ranks have included how functional approaches affect codebases, what unit tests do to code, and a look at singletons.  Today, we’ll take a look at extension methods and what properties of codebases they correlate with.

Continue reading Extension Methods and the Decline of Traditional OOP