NDepend

Improve your .NET code quality with NDepend

Adding Static Analysis to Your Team’s DNA

Stop me if this sounds familiar.  (Well, not literally.  I realize that asynchronous publication makes it hard for you to actually stop me as I type.  Indulge me the figure of speech.)  You work on a codebase for a long time, all the while having the foreboding sense of growing messiness.  One day, perhaps when you have a bit of extra time, you download a static analyzer to tell you “how bad.”

Then you have an experience like a holiday-time binge eater getting on a scale on January 1st.  As the tool crunches its results, you wince in anticipation.  Next, you get the results, get depressed, and then get busy correcting them.  Unlike shedding those holiday pounds, you can often fix the most egregious errors in your codebase in a matter of days.  So you make those fixes, pat yourself on the back, and forget all about the static analyzer, perhaps letting your trial expire or leaving it to sit on the shelf.

If you’re wondering how I got in your head, consider that I see this pattern in client shops frequently.  They regard static analysis as a one time cleanup effort, to be implemented as a small project every now and then.  Then, they resolve to carry the learning forward to avoid making similar mistakes.  But, in a vacuum, they rarely do.
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The Fastest Way to Get to Know NDepend

I confess to a certain level of avoidance when it comes to tackling something new.  If pressed for introspection, I think I do this because I can’t envision a direct path to success.  Instead, I see where I am now, the eventual goal, and a big uncertain cloud of stuff in the middle.  So I procrastinate by finding other things that need doing.

Sooner or later, however, I need to put this aside and get down to business.  For me, this usually means breaking the problem into smaller problems, identifying manageable next actions, and tackling those.  Once things become concrete, I can move methodically.  (As an aside this is one of many reasons that I love test driven development — it forces this behavior.)

When dealing with a new product or utility that I have acquired, this generally means carving out a path toward some objective and then executing.  For instance, “learn Ruby” as a goal would leave me floundering.  But “use Ruby to build a service that extracts data via API X” would result in a series of smaller goals and actions.  And I would learn via those goals.

For NDepend, I have a recommendation along these lines.  Let’s use the tool to help you visualize your the reality of your codebase better than anyone around you.  In doing this, you will get to know NDepend quickly and without feeling overwhelmed.
Continue reading The Fastest Way to Get to Know NDepend

trend metrics

Keep Your Codebase Fit with Trend Metrics

A while back, I wrote a post about the importance of trends when discussing code metrics.  Metrics have an impact when teams are first exposed to them, but that tends to fade with time.  Context and trend monitoring create and sustain a sense of urgency.

To understand what I mean, imagine a person aware that he has put on some weight over the years.  One day, he steps on a scale and realizes that he’s much heavier than previously thought.  That induces a moment of shock and, no doubt, grand plans for gyms, diets, and lifestyle adjustments.  But, as time passes, his attitude may shift to one in which the new, heavier weight defines his self-conception.  The weight metric loses its impact.

To avoid this, he needs to continue measuring himself.  He may see himself gaining further weight, poking a hole in the illusion that he has evened out.  Or, conversely, he may see that small adjustments have helped him lose weight, and be encouraged to continue with those adjustments.  In either case, his ongoing conception of progress, more than the actual weight metric, drives and motivates behaviours.

The same holds true with codebases and keeping them clean.  All too often, I see organizations run some sort of static analysis or linting tool on their codebase, and conclude “it’s bad.”  They resolve only to do a better job in a year or two when the rewrite will start.  However good or bad any given figure might be, the trend-line, and not the figure itself, holds the most significance.

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Managing Code Analysis Statistics with the NDepend API

If you’re familiar with NDepend, you’re probably familiar with the Visual Studio plugin, the out of the box metrics, the excellent visualization tools, and the iconic Zone of Uselessness/Zone of Pain chart.  These feel familiar to NDepend users and have likely found their way into the normal application development process. NDepend has other features as well, however, some of which I do not necessarily hear discussed as frequently.  The NDepend API has membership in that “lesser known NDepend features club.”  Yes, that’s right — if you didn’t know this, NDepend has an API that you can use.

You may be familiar, as a user, with the NDepend power tools.  These include some pretty powerful capabilities, such as duplicate code detection, so it stands to reason that you may have played with them or even that you might routinely use them.  But what you may not realize is the power tools’ source code accompanies the installation of NDepend, and it furnishes a great series of examples on how to use the NDepend API.

NDepend’s API is contained in the DLLs that support the executable and plugin, so you needn’t do anything special to obtain it.  The NDepend website also treats the API as a first class citizen, providing detailed, excellent documentation.   With your NDepend installation, you can get up and running quickly with the API.

Probably the easiest way to introduce yourself is to open the source code for the power tools project and to add a power tool, or generally to modify that assembly.  If you want to create your own assembly to use the power tools, you can do that as well, though it is a bit more involved.  The purpose of this post is not to do a walk-through of setting up with the power tools, since that can be found here.  I will mention two things, however, that are worth bearing in mind as you get started.

  1. If you want to use the API outside of the installed project directory, there is additional setup overhead.  Because it leverages proprietary parts of NDepend under the covers, setup is more involved than just adding a DLL by reference.
  2. Because of point (1), if you want to create your own assembly outside of the NDepend project structure, be sure to follow the setup instructions exactly.

A Use Case

I’ve spoken so far in generalities about the API.  If you haven’t already used it, you might be wondering what kinds of applications it has, besides simply being interesting to play with.  Fair enough.

One interesting use case that I’ve experienced personally is getting information out of NDepend in a customized format.  For example, let’s say I’m analyzing a client’s codebase and want to cite statistical information about types and methods in the code.  Out of the box, what I do is open Visual Studio and then open NDepend’s query/rules editor.  This gives me the ability to create ad-hoc CQLinq queries that will have the information I need.

But from there, I have to transcribe the results into a format that I want, such as a spreadsheet.  That’s fine for small projects or sample sizes, but it becomes unwieldy if I want to plot statistics in large codebases.  To address this, I have enlisted the NDepend API.

Continue reading Managing Code Analysis Statistics with the NDepend API

Code Metric Visualization: Lines of Code and Code Coverage

One of the features of NDepend that we get a lot of positive feedback about is its data visualization, and it’s really no surprise. The code metric visualizations allow teams and managers to quickly see what is happening in their code base. With NDepend’s custom code metrics, developers can generate visual reports of what matters to facilitate teamwork as well as keep management in the loop.

We have written before about how a company can use NDepend’s visualizations as a sort of “radiator” to track changes in the source code over time. We also have examples of companies (such as Stago and Siemens Healthcare) using it to great effect in helping architects and developers communicate effectively.  This resulted in producing better quality end products while still meeting deadlines.

Not only is it very informative, but the treemap view is also pretty aesthetically pleasing. We wanted to show it off and at the same time give a glimpse of how NDepend has changed over the years. We are all about making your code beautiful and following best practices, so now you can see how well we follow our own rules. Continue reading Code Metric Visualization: Lines of Code and Code Coverage

NDepend vs. ReSharper

Not too long ago, someone asked me for a comparison of ReSharper (commonly and affectionately abbreviated R#) and NDepend.  I didn’t really grok the question, so I asked, “in what sense?”  The response was, “well, let’s say NDepend vs ReSharper — which makes more sense for a given person?”  Bemused, my slightly snarky quip in response was, “doctor vs dentist — which makes more sense for a given person?”

I went on to clarify the analogy.  Doctors and dentists both provide healthcare services, so, in this sense, one could theoretically view them as competitors.  But practically speaking, that competition is going to be rare or nonexistent.  There is an intersection between what the tools offer, as would be the case if a dentist noticed a throat infection or a doctor needed to peer into your mouth.  And yet that intersection is small because the two products, like doctors and dentists, have fundamentally different charters.

I’ll return to that in a bit, though.

Continue reading NDepend vs. ReSharper

The Better Code Book – Our MVPs of 2015

We firmly believe spaghetti belongs on the dinner table and not in code. Our mission when starting NDepend was to create a tool to make best coding practices easier to maintain and improve. Writing has always been part of our message (see Patrick Smacchia’s work on CodeBetter.com) and we are proud to present our favorite pieces of writing from around the web in the last year, collected in what we are calling the Better Code Book.

We wanted to focus not only on how people use NDepend to improve their code for developers and architects, but also how to use static analysis in a broader, management sense. We are extremely grateful for our contributors in this project. Let us introduce them:

Bjørn Einar Bjartnes is a developer at the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. His current role is a backend developer at the API team, serving web, mobile, TV clients and more metadata about programs- and video-streams. He holds a MSc in Engineering Cybernetics and has a background from the petroleum industry, which has probably shaped his view on systems design. Also, Bjørn is active in the local F# Meetup and a proud member of the lambda club, playing with all things useless related to computers. You can also follow him on Twitter: @bjartnes

Jack Robinson is a twenty-something student in his final year of a degree in Software Engineering at Victoria University of Wellington. Currently an Intern Developer at Xero, he enjoys writing clean code, playing a board game or two with his friends, or just sitting down and watching a good film. You can read not just his musings on computer science, but also reviews on films and more at his website jackrobinson.co.nz

Prasad Narravula is a programmer, architect, consultant, and problem-solving leader.  He helps teams in agile development essentials- feedback loops to fail fast, enabling (engineering) practices, iterative and incremental design, starting at the right place, discovery, and learning. When time permits, he writes at ObjectCraftworks.com.

Erik Dietrich, founder of DaedTech LLC, is a programmer, architect, development coach, writer, Pluralsight author, and technologist. You can read his writing and find out more about him at http://www.daedtech.com/ and you can follow him on Twitter @daedtech.

Anthony Sciamanna is a software developer from Philadelphia, PA who has worked in the industry for nearly 20 years. He specializes in leading and coaching development teams, improving development practices for cross-functional teams, Test-Driven Development (TDD), unit testing, pair programming, and other Agile / eXtreme Programming (XP) practices. He can be contacted via his website: anthonysciamanna.com

Tomasz Jaskula is a software craftsman, founder and organizer of Paris user groups for F# and Domain Driven Design. He focuses on creating software delivering true business value which aligns with the business’s strategic initiatives and bears solutions with clearly identifiable competitive advantage. He is currently working for a big French bank building reactive applications in F# and C#. In his free time, he runs a startup project on applying machine learning with F# to the recruitment field, speaks at conferences and user groups, and writes blogs and articles for a French magazine for coders called “Programmez !” You can visit his site jaskula.fr

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NDepend in visual studio

Put a Little NDepend in your Visual Studio

The software development world is filled with what I think of as “Coke-Pepsi” debates. This is how my brain categorizes debates over preference that are almost entirely subjective. There is no right or wrong answer to “is Coke or Pepsi better?” The answer is, “whichever one you like better.”

Examples abound in the software world. Should you use a heavyweight IDE or a lightweight text editor? Which OOP language is ‘the best?’ And, speaking of OOP, should you use an OOP language at all, or should you use a functional one? Pascal casing or camel? The list goes on, but these sorts of things generally boil down to the comfort and preferences of the person or team.

It would be tempting to paint NDepend Standalone versus NDepend’s Visual Studio plugin with this brush. And, while I think you could make a pretty legitimate case that this too, is simply a matter of preference, I’d like to do a thought exercise today in which I lobby in favor of the integration approach. In my opinion, there are enough advantages that I might be able to sneak this one out of the Coke-vs-Pepsi realm. Continue reading Put a Little NDepend in your Visual Studio

calculating ROI of NDepend

Calculating the ROI of NDepend

Years ago, I discovered NDepend and downloaded it for a trial.  At the time, I found myself working in a .NET shop where a lot of developers worked in the same large WPF codebase.  Code reviews were mandated, debates were frequent and impassioned, and global variables were everywhere, to the dismay of only some of us.  There was an entrenched majority that favored (or at least didn’t mind) a highly procedural style of writing object-oriented software, and nobody seemed able to put their fingers on why most feature development there had slowed to a crawl.

I was new to the group and had to pick my battles, particularly with people that had been there a long time.  Developers who favored automated testing and craftsmanship principles were in the minority there and had a history of leaving out of frustration, so I knew it’d be a challenge, and I went looking for help.  Among other things, I found NDepend and, after installing a trial, I recognized the power of the tool.

I recognized that it could help me as an objective, unbiased partner in making my arguments, but I also recognized that the way I approached code and architecture would never be the same.  The ability to visualize architecture in real time, the ability to treat code as queryable data, the metrics, the statistics, the well thought-out code warnings… it was a game-changer for me.  I just needed to convince my manager to let me spend a few hundred dollars to convert my trial version into a paid version.

It turned out this wasn’t hard, at least for me.  I had the good fortune of working for a company that appropriated a tools and learning budget for each individual developer, meaning all I had to do was declare that I wanted some of my total spend to go toward NDepend.  I did it without blinking.  But it might be that you aren’t as lucky.  Maybe you find yourself in a similar position to mine back then, but wanting to convince your manager that this powerful tool is indispensable because you don’t have a discretionary tools budget.

ROI: The Language of Management

I think I can help you here.  After all, I did leverage my experience running an IT department into a Plurlasight course about how to lobby your managers for practices and tools.  And the key to making a business case for anything, NDepend included, is to talk in terms of profits and losses, rather than in terms of, “it’s awesome, and it has all these graphs, and it shows me these rules, and CQLinq is the coolest thing ever, and…”  You get the idea.  NDepend’s coolness factor isn’t going to convince your manager to buy it for you.

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The Case for the NDepend Dashboard Feature

If you hang around agile circles long enough, you’re quite likely to hear the terms “big, visible chart” and “information radiator.”  I think both of these loosely originate from the general management concept that, to demonstrably improve something, you must first measure and track it.  A “big, visible chart” is information that an individual or team displays in, well, big and visible fashion.  An information radiator is more or less the same concept (I’m sure it’s possible for someone who is an 8th degree agile black belt to sharp-shoot this, but I think you’d be hard pressed to argue that this isn’t the gist).

Big, Visible Information Radiators

As perhaps the most ubiquitous example imaginable, consider the factory sign that proudly displays, “____ days since the last accident,” where, hopefully, the blank contains a large number.  A sign like this is far from a feel-good vanity metrics; it actually alters behavior.  Imagine a factory where lots of accidents happen.  Line managers can call meetings and harp on the importance of safety, but probably to limited effect.  After all, the prospect of a floor incident is abstract, particularly for someone to whom it hasn’t ever happened.

But if you start putting a number on it, the concept becomes less abstract.  “Currently we have an incident every day, but we want to try to make it happen only once per month, and we’re going to keep track.”  Now, each incident means that the entire factory fails each and every day, and it does so visibly.  Incidents go from “someone else’s problem that you hear about anecdotally from time to time” to “the thing that’s making us fail visibly.”  And then you’ll find that doing nothing but making the number very visible will actually serve to alter behavior — people will be more careful so as not to be responsible for tanking the team’s metrics.

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