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Service Oriented Architecture, A Dead Simple Explanation

Service Oriented Architecture: A Dead Simple Explanation

Service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been with us for a long time. The term first appeared in 1998, and since then it’s grown in popularity. It’s also branched into several variants, including microservice architecture. While microservices dominate the landscape, reports of SOA’s death have been greatly exaggerated. So, let’s go over what SOA is. We’ll cover why it’s an architectural pattern that isn’t going anywhere. Then we’ll see how you can apply its design concepts to your work. Continue reading Service Oriented Architecture: A Dead Simple Explanation

REST_vs_RESTful_The_Different_and_Why_the_Difference_Doesn_t_Matter

REST vs. RESTful: The Difference and Why the Difference Doesn’t Matter

What’s the difference between a REST API and a RESTful one? Is there a difference? This sounds like the kind of academic question that belongs on Reddit. But then you find yourself in a design session, and the person across the table is raising their voice.

The short answer is that REST stands for Representational State Transfer. It’s an architectural pattern for creating web services. A RESTful service is one that implements that pattern.

The long answer starts with “sort of” and “it depends” and continues with more complete definitions.

Continue reading REST vs. RESTful: The Difference and Why the Difference Doesn’t Matter

How to Measure Lines of Code Let's Count the Ways

How to Measure Lines of Code? Let’s Count the Ways

There are a few ways to count lines of code, and they each have their advantages and disadvantages.

Much of the differences come down to defining what a “line” is. Is a line a literalĀ line in the source file, a logical statement in the language we’re using, or an executable instruction?

Let’s take a look at three metrics:

  • Source lines of code—the number of lines of code in a method, skipping comments and blank lines
  • Logical lines of code—the number of statements, ignoring formattingĀ  and often counting a line as more than one statement
  • IL instructions—the number of instructions that the code compiles to

Is one better than the other? It depends on what you’re trying to measure.

Continue reading How to Measure Lines of Code? Let’s Count the Ways