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When_Is_It_Okay_to_Use_a_C#_Partial_Class

When Is It Okay to Use a C# Partial Class?

Today’s post attempts to answer a very simple and straightforward question: “When is it OK to use a C# partial class?” And the answer as straightforward as this: “When you need to allow the user to edit code that was automatically generated.”

Whoa, that was hands down the easiest post I’ve ever written. So, that’s it for today, folks. Thanks for reading and see you next time!

OK, I’m just kidding, of course. If you’ve found this page by googling around on “C# partial class,” chances are you have a number of questions regarding this topic. For starters, what is a partial class? How do you actually use it? Are there any restrictions regarding its use? And the list could go on.

That’s what today’s post is all about. We’ll start out by explaining what a partial class is and providing some examples. Then, we’ll go a little bit deeper, giving a more detailed view of the partial class, its inner workings, and the rules that must be followed when using it.

Finally, we’ll explain the main use case for the C# partial class, nicely tying the end of the post to its beginning.

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extension_methods_decline_of_traditional_oop

Extension Methods and the Decline of Traditional OOP

A bunch of years ago, I wrote a post on my own personal blog titled, “Why I Don’t Like C# Extension Methods.”  Over the years, I’ve updated that post a bit, but mostly left it intact for posterity I guess.  But if you ask me how that post has aged, I’d respond with “it’s complicated.”

I didn’t like extension methods back then.  I do like them now, provided they aren’t abused.

So, what gives?  Am I just a hypocrite?  Or is it a matter of growth?

Well, none of the above, I’d argue.  Instead, the programming landscape has changed and evolved.  And I’d submit that extension methods were actually ahead of their time when the language authors came up with the concept.  But now they’re hitting their stride.

Don’t take my word for it, though.  This is another one of my research posts, whose previous ranks have included how functional approaches affect codebases, what unit tests do to code, and a look at singletons.  Today, we’ll take a look at extension methods and what properties of codebases they correlate with.

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shotgun_surgery_what_is_it_ndepend

Shotgun Surgery: What It Is and How to Stop It

I really love the name “shotgun surgery” for describing a code smell.  It’s sort of an interesting mix of aggressive and comical, and so it paints a memorable picture.  I kind of picture Elmer Fudd blasting away at a codebase and then declaring “ship it” and doing some kind of one-click production push.

But misappropriating Looney Tunes aside, what actually is shotgun surgery?

Well, it’s a specific code smell in your codebase.  Shotgun surgery happens when you have to make many changes in your codebase to achieve seemingly simple tasks.  Often, you’ll find yourself making changes to code that seems pretty similar, either copy-pasted directly, or else of similar intent.

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