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Rewrite or Refactor?

I’ve trod this path before in various incarnations and I’ll do it again today.  After all, I can think of few topics in software development that draw as much debate as this one.  “We’ve got this app, and we want to know if we should refactor it or rewrite it.”

For what it’s worth, I answer this question for a living.  And I don’t mean that in the general sense that anyone in software must ponder the question.  I mean that CIOs, dev managers and boards of directors literally pay me to help them figure out whether to rewrite, retire, refactor, or rework an application.  I go in, gather evidence, mine the data and state my case about the recommended fate for the app.

Because of this vocation and because of my writing, people often ask my opinion on this topic.  Today, I yet again answer such a question.  “How do I know when to rewrite an app instead of just refactoring it?”  I’ll answer.  Sort of.  But, before I do, let’s briefly revisit some of my past opinions. Continue reading Rewrite or Refactor?

Secrets of Maintainable Codebases

You should write maintainable code.  I assume people have told you this at some point.  The admonishment is as obligatory as it is vague.  So, I’m sure, when you heard this, you didn’t react effusively with, “oh, good idea — thanks!”

If you take to the Internet, you won’t need to venture far to find essays, lists, and stack exchange questions on the subject.  As you can see, software developers frequently offer opinions on this particular topic.  And I present no exception; I have little doubt that you could find posts about this on my own blog.

So today, I’d like to take a different tack in talking about maintainable code.  Rather than discuss the code per se, I want to discuss the codebase as a whole.  What are the secrets to maintainable codebases?  What properties do they have, and what can you do to create these properties?

In my travels as a consultant, I have seen so many codebases that it sometimes seems I’m watching a flip book show of code.  On top of that, I frequently find myself explaining concepts like the cost of code ownership, and regarding code as, for lack of a better term, inventory.  From the perspective of those paying the bills, maintainable code doesn’t mean “code developers like to work with” but rather “code that minimizes spend for future changes.”

Yes, that money includes developer labor.  But it also includes concerns like deployment effort, defect cycle time, the universality of skills required, and plenty more.  Maintainable codebases mean easy, fast, risk-free, and cheap change.  Here are some characteristics in the field that I use when assessing this property.  Some of them may seem a bit off the beaten path.

Continue reading Secrets of Maintainable Codebases

what to do when your colleague creates spaghetti code

What to do when Your Colleague Creates Spaghetti Code

I write for a number of different outfits and earn my living consulting around software and IT.  Because of the intersection of these three concerns — writing, offering advice professionally, and software — I field a lot of requests for advice on how to do the right technical thing without everyone around you shooting holes in it.  Consider an example.

“How can we get started with unit testing?”

Considered as a technical question alone, this invites a fairly obtuse response.  “First, write a unit test.  Second, run the unit test.”  Obviously, that’s not really what anyone is asking when they ask this question.

Instead, they want to know something orders of magnitude more complex.  “How can we overcome years of inertia, a nasty legacy codebase, Bill, who has been around for 40 years and hates everything new, and the fact that management doesn’t want to pay us to write ‘extra’ code… and then start unit testing?”  Oh, yeah, that.  Well, that’s complicated.

I frequently hear such apparently-innocuous-but-actually-complex questions about code quality.  “This idiot on my team is writing mountains of the most unmaintainable garbage imaginable — what should I do?”

Usually, this sort of question comes to me from people at client sites.  And, accordingly, I have to balance the answer that makes the most sense for the individual with the one that keeps the client’s best interests in mind.  The client pays my bill, and I have a charter to lower the cost of ownership and development of their code.

But when I’m in writer mode, and only the asker’s interests matter, I’l give a subtly different answer.  Today, I’d like to offer advice on what you should do in this situation.

Continue reading What to do when Your Colleague Creates Spaghetti Code

company coding standards

How to Get Company Coding Standards Right (and Wrong)

Nothing compares with the first week on a new job or team.  You experience an interesting swirl of anticipation, excitement, novelty, nervousness, and probably various other emotions I’m forgetting.  What will your new life be like?  How can you impress your teammates?  Where do you get a cup of coffee around here?

If you write code for a living, you know some specific new job peculiarities.  Do they have a machine with runnable code ready on day one?  Or do you have to go through some protracted onboarding process before you can even look at code?  And speaking of code, does theirs square with elegant use of design patterns and unit testing that they advertised during the interview process?  Or does it look like someone made a Death Star out of bailing wire and glue?

But one of the most pivotal moments (for me, anyway) comes innocuously enough.  It usually happens with an offhand comment from a senior developer or through something mentioned in your orientation packet.  You find yourself directed to the company coding standards document.  Oh, boy.

At this point, I start to wonder.  Will I find myself glancing at a one-pager that says, “follow the Microsoft guidelines whenever possible and only include one class per file?”  Or, will I find something far more sinister?  Images of a power-mad architect with a gleam in his eye and a convoluted variable name encoding scheme in his back pocket pop into my head.  Will I therefore spend the next six months waging pitched battles over the placement of underscores?

Ugh, Company Coding Standards

In this post, believe it or not, I’m going to make the case for coding standards.  But before I do so, I want to make my skepticism very clear.  Accordingly, I want to talk first about how coding standards fail.

Based on personal battle scars and my own experience, I tend to judge coding standard documents as guilty until proven innocent.  I cannot tell you how many groups I have encountered where a company coding standard was drafted, “just because.”  In fact, I’ve even written about this in the past.

Continue reading How to Get Company Coding Standards Right (and Wrong)

trend metrics

Keep Your Codebase Fit with Trend Metrics

A while back, I wrote a post about the importance of trends when discussing code metrics.  Metrics have an impact when teams are first exposed to them, but that tends to fade with time.  Context and trend monitoring create and sustain a sense of urgency.

To understand what I mean, imagine a person aware that he has put on some weight over the years.  One day, he steps on a scale and realizes that he’s much heavier than previously thought.  That induces a moment of shock and, no doubt, grand plans for gyms, diets, and lifestyle adjustments.  But, as time passes, his attitude may shift to one in which the new, heavier weight defines his self-conception.  The weight metric loses its impact.

To avoid this, he needs to continue measuring himself.  He may see himself gaining further weight, poking a hole in the illusion that he has evened out.  Or, conversely, he may see that small adjustments have helped him lose weight, and be encouraged to continue with those adjustments.  In either case, his ongoing conception of progress, more than the actual weight metric, drives and motivates behaviours.

The same holds true with codebases and keeping them clean.  All too often, I see organizations run some sort of static analysis or linting tool on their codebase, and conclude “it’s bad.”  They resolve only to do a better job in a year or two when the rewrite will start.  However good or bad any given figure might be, the trend-line, and not the figure itself, holds the most significance.

Continue reading Keep Your Codebase Fit with Trend Metrics